Strategy – Fibria
Sustainability

Strategy

At Fibria, sustainability is a transversal concept that permeates all operations involved in pulp production, from end to end. From eucalyptus nurseries to final deliveries to clients, sustainability is not just about inspiring the company’s conduct on social and environmental issues; it is a key driver of growth and value creation. And that also drives our competitiveness. Sustainability, therefore, plays a key role in the company’s business strategy.

An initiative that exemplifies sustainability as a business driver at Fibria is the Rural Land Development Program (PDRT). The initiative, which benefited 56 communities and over 5,000 families in 2016, supported the creation of job opportunities in agriculture, combated the theft of wood from the company and offered families a new path. The communities get a new option for generating income, while the company, by reducing wood theft, boosts its profitability and competitiveness, which represents a practical application of the concept of shared value, as defined by professors Mark Kramer and Michael Porter from Harvard University.

Initiatives like this are only possible because Fibria cultivates dialogue with all stakeholders, whether neighboring and traditional communities, the government, non-profit organizations, business partners, suppliers or clients. Its goal is to strike a balance between all interests. Based on this principle, the company’s focus is to work on continually reducing the impacts caused by its operations, while seeking partnerships to jointly build solutions for its challenges, whether in the social, environmental or business spheres.

Maintain its connection with the business, Fibria has a series of initiatives and programs that focus on environmental, social and economic issues. Fibria also conducts its business activities within the parameters established by the most widely recognized certifying bodies, in both its forestry and industrial operations. See all the certifications that Fibria holds.

Fibria also analyzes how its strategy intersects with the contribution made by its operations to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), given its belief that engagement by the private sector is essential to accelerating the 2030 Agenda discussed by the United Nations General Assembly. Click here to learn more about the connection between Fibria’s initiatives and the SDGs.

Another strategic sustainability aspect for Fibria is actively participating in the debate on the practices and major issues of the forestry and pulp industries. The company is signatory to a number of Brazilian and international commitments. Learn more here.

Long-Term Targets

In line with its sustainability strategy, in 2011, Fibria set long-term targets for its forestry and industrial operations and their external impacts. These targets are aligned with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, which is the United Nations action plan to promote the well-being of people and the planet and the prosperity of all. The goal of the long-term targets is to ensure effective implementation of Fibria’s strategy and sustainability. Every year, in its Annual Report, the company provides an account of the results achieved in the period. Follow the evolution of goals in the Annual Report.

Goal: optimize the use of natural resources

Target: reduce by one-third the area needed for planting eucalyptus

Know more

How:

raising productivity from 10 tons of pulp per hectare per year in 2011 to 15 tons per hectare per year in 2025 by:

  • Adopting conventional genetic enhancement techniques;
  • Improving forest management;
  • Increasing industrial productivity.

Benefits:

  • Lower concentration of land;
  • Higher availability of land for other uses;Increased competitiveness and higher returns for shareholders.

Check here.

Goal: help to mitigate the greenhouse effect

Target: double the absorption of carbon from the air

Know more

How:

increasing net sequestration from 5.5 million tCO2e/year in 2011 to 11.1 million tCO2e/year in 2025 by:

  • Expanding forest areas (eucalyptus plantations and conservation areas);
  • Restoring degraded areas with native species.

Benefits:

  • Reducing the concentration of greenhouse gases in the air.

Check here.

Goal: protect biodiversity

Target: promote the environmental restoration of 40,000 hectares of own areas by 2025

Know more

How:

  • Planting native forest species;
  • Stimulating and supporting the natural regeneration of native species;
  • Eliminating degradation factors and exotic species.

Benefits:

  • Enriching wildlife and plant species, including endangered species, in the Atlantic Rainforest and Cerrado biomes;
  • Expanding environmental services (carbon sequestration, water availability and quality, etc.) on areas whose original characteristics were altered by human activity.

Check here.

 

Goal: increase eco-efficiency

Target: reduce by 91% the amount of industrial solid waste sent to landfills

Know more

How:

reducing the amount from 60 kg/ton of pulp in 2011 to 5 kg/ton of pulp in 2025 by:

  • Reducing the generation of solid waste at plants;
  • Reusing solid waste as a soil amendment.

Benefits:

  • Reduction in the impacts and risks caused by industrial landfills;
  • Increase in the eco-efficiency of the company’s production processes;
  • Reduction in costs with the disposal of solid waste and the substitution of inputs.

Check here.

Goal: strengthen interaction between the company and society

Target: 1 - reach an 80% approval rate in local communities

Know more

How:

increasing the approval rate in local communities from 50% in 2011 to 80% in 2025 by:

  • Improving the quality of relations with local communities;
  • Supporting local development projects;
  • Including the community in the company’s value chain.

Benefits:

  • Harmonious coexistence with local communities;
  • Environment that encourages local development.

Check here.

Goal: strengthen interaction between the company and society

Target: 2 - helping local communities to make sustainable 70% of the income generation projects supported by companies

Know more

How:

evolve from 5% of sustainable projects in 2011 to 70% in 2025 by:

  • Expanding the Rural Land Development Program (PDRT) model;
  • Offering technical and managerial training through consulting firms and partnerships;
  • Attracting support from other partners.

Benefits:

  • Social inclusion of communities, reducing their social and economic vulnerability;
  • Community playing a leading role in its development process;
  • Improving the managerial and technical qualifications of community members;
  • Communities’ independence with regard to the public or private sectors;
  • Fostering the construction social capital;
  • Reducing conflicts and maintaining good relations with local communities.

Check here.

Goal: optimize water management

Target: expand this progress to the forestry, nursery and industrial areas

Know more

How:

Water consumption is a critical topic for our business. Therefore, in 2017, Fibria set a long-term target for its water consumption in its forest, nursery and industrial operations.

In the forest operations, the goal is to adopt effective water management in Fibria’s micro-basins and to disseminate technical know-how on the topic to our neighbors in critical basins

In the nurseries, the goal is to reduce by 17% specific water consumption per seedling produced.

In the industrial operations, the goal is to reduce by 17% the consumption of water per ton of pulp produced.

Check here.

You may also be interested in these